Wordscapes Level 1276, Pebble 12 Answers

The Wordscapes level 1276 is a part of the set Beach and comes in position 12 of Pebble pack. Players who will solve it will recieve 37 brilliance additional points which help you imporve your rankings in leaderboard.
The tray contains 7 letters which are ‘LAMIAGC’, with those letters, you can place 9 words in the crossword. and 4 words that aren’t in the puzzle worth the equivalent of 4 coin(s).This level has no extra word.

Wordscapes level 1276 Pebble 12 Answers :

wordscapes level 1276 answer

Bonus Words:

  • ALGA
  • AMIGA
  • GLIA
  • MAGI

Regular Words:

  • CALM
  • CLAIM
  • CLAM
  • GALA
  • GLAM
  • MAGIC
  • MAGICAL
  • MAIL
  • MICA

Definitions:

  • Calm : Freodom from motion, agitation, or disturbance; a cessation or abeence of that which causes motion or disturbance, as of winds or waves; tranquility; stilness; quiet; serenity. The wind ceased, and there was a great calm. Mark. iv. 39. A calm before a storm is commonly a peace of a man’s own making. South.nn1. To make calm; to render still or quet, as elements; as, to calm the winds. To calm the tempest raised by Eolus. Dryden. 2. To deliver from agitation or excitement; to still or soothe, as the mind or passions. Passions which seem somewhat calmed. Syn. — To still; quiet; appease; ally; pacigy; tranquilize; soothe; compose; assuage; check; restrain.nn1. Not stormy; without motion, as of winds or waves; still; quiet; serene; undisturbed. “Calm was the day.” Spenser. Now all is calm, and fresh, and still. Bryant. 2. Undisturbed by passion or emotion; not agitated or excited; tranquil; quiet in act or speech. “Calm and sinless peace.” Milton. “With calm attention.” Pope. Such calm old age as conscience pure And self-commanding hearts ensure. Keble. Syn. — Still; quiet; undisturbed; tranquil; peaceful; serene; composed; unruffled; sedate; collected; placid.
  • Claim : 1. To ask for, or seek to obtain, by virtue of authority, right, or supposed right; to challenge as a right; to demand as due. 2. To proclaim. [Obs.] Spenser. 3. To call or name. [Obs.] Spenser. 4. To assert; to maintain. [Colloq.]nnTo be entitled to anything; to deduce a right or title; to have a claim. We must know how the first ruler, from whom any one claims, came by his authority. Locke.nn1. A demand of a right or supposed right; a calling on another for something due or supposed to be due; an assertion of a right or fact. 2. A right to claim or demand something; a title to any debt, privilege, or other thing in possession of another; also, a title to anything which another should give or concede to, or confer on, the claimant. “A bar to all claims upon land.” Hallam. 3. The thing claimed or demanded; that (as land) to which any one intends to establish a right; as a settler’s claim; a miner’s claim. [U.S. & Australia] 4. A laoud call. [Obs.] Spenser To lay claim to, to demand as a right. “Doth he lay claim to thine inheritance” Shak.
  • Clam : 1. (Zoöl.) A bivalve mollusk of many kinds, especially those that are edible; as, the long clam (Mya arenaria), the quahog or round clam (Venus mercenaria), the sea clam or hen clam (Spisula solidissima), and other species of the United States. The name is said to have been given originally to the Tridacna gigas, a huge East Indian bivalve. You shall scarce find any bay or shallow shore, or cove of sand, where you may not take many clampes, or lobsters, or both, at your pleasure. Capt. John Smith (1616). Clams, or clamps, is a shellfish not much unlike a coclke; it lieth under the sand. Wood (1634). 2. (Ship Carp.) Strong pinchers or forceps. 3. pl. (Mech.) A kind of vise, usually of wood. Blood clam. See under Blood.nnTo clog, as with glutinous or viscous matter. A swarm of wasps got into a honey pot, and there they cloyed and clammed Themselves till there was no getting out again. L’Estrange.nnTo be moist or glutinous; to stick; to adhere. [R.] DrydennnClaminess; moisture. [R.] “The clam of death.” Carlyle.nnA crash or clangor made by ringing all the bells of a chime at once. Nares.nnTo produce, in bell ringing, a clam or clangor; to cause to clang. Nares.
  • Gala : Pomp, show, or festivity. Macaulay. Gala day, a day of mirth and festivity; a holiday.
  • Magic : A comprehensive name for all of the pretended arts which claim to produce effects by the assistance of supernatural beings, or departed spirits, or by a mastery of secret forces in nature attained by a study of occult science, including enchantment, conjuration, witchcraft, sorcery, necromancy, incantation, etc. An appearance made by some magic. Chaucer. Celestial magic, a supposed supernatural power which gave to spirits a kind of dominion over the planets, and to the planets an influence over men. — Natural magic, the art of employing the powers of nature to produce effects apparently supernatural. — Superstitious, or Geotic, magic, the invocation of devils or demons, involving the supposition of some tacit or express agreement between them and human beings. Syn. — Sorcery; witchcraft; necromancy; conjuration; enchantment.nn1. Pertaining to the hidden wisdom supposed to be possessed by the Magi; relating to the occult powers of nature, and the producing of effects by their agency. 2. Performed by, or proceeding from, occult and superhuman agencies; done by, or seemingly done by, enchantment or sorcery. Hence: Seemingly requiring more than human power; imposing or startling in performance; producing effects which seem supernatural or very extraordinary; having extraordinary properties; as, a magic lantern; a magic square or circle. The painter’s magic skill. Cowper. Note: Although with certain words magic is used more than magical, — as, magic circle, magic square, magic wand, — we may in general say magic or magical; as, a magic or magical effect; a magic or magical influence, etc. But when the adjective is predicative, magical, and not magic, is used; as, the effect was magical. Magic circle, a series of concentric circles containing the numbers 12 to 75 in eight radii, and having somewhat similar properties to the magic square. — Magic humming bird (Zoöl.), a Mexican humming bird (Iache magica) , having white downy thing tufts. — Magic lantern. See Lantern. — Magic square, numbers so disposed in parallel and equal rows in the form of a square, that each row, taken vertically, horizontally, or diagonally, shall give the same sum, the same product, or an harmonical series, according as the numbers taken are in arithmetical, geometrical, or harmonical progression. — Magic wand, a wand used by a magician in performing feats of magic.
  • Magical : 1. Pertaining to the hidden wisdom supposed to be possessed by the Magi; relating to the occult powers of nature, and the producing of effects by their agency. 2. Performed by, or proceeding from, occult and superhuman agencies; done by, or seemingly done by, enchantment or sorcery. Hence: Seemingly requiring more than human power; imposing or startling in performance; producing effects which seem supernatural or very extraordinary; having extraordinary properties; as, a magic lantern; a magic square or circle. The painter’s magic skill. Cowper. Note: Although with certain words magic is used more than magical, — as, magic circle, magic square, magic wand, — we may in general say magic or magical; as, a magic or magical effect; a magic or magical influence, etc. But when the adjective is predicative, magical, and not magic, is used; as, the effect was magical. Magic circle, a series of concentric circles containing the numbers 12 to 75 in eight radii, and having somewhat similar properties to the magic square. — Magic humming bird (Zoöl.), a Mexican humming bird (Iache magica) , having white downy thing tufts. — Magic lantern. See Lantern. — Magic square, numbers so disposed in parallel and equal rows in the form of a square, that each row, taken vertically, horizontally, or diagonally, shall give the same sum, the same product, or an harmonical series, according as the numbers taken are in arithmetical, geometrical, or harmonical progression. — Magic wand, a wand used by a magician in performing feats of magic.
  • Mail : A spot. [Obs.]nn1. A small piece of money; especially, an English silver half-penny of the time of Henry V. [Obs.] [Written also maile, and maille.] 2. Rent; tribute. [Obs., except in certain compounds and phrases, as blackmail, mails and duties, etc.] Mail and duties (Scots Law), the rents of an estate, in whatever form paid.nn1. A flexible fabric made of metal rings interlinked. It was used especially for defensive armor. Chaucer. Chain mail, Coat of mail. See under Chain, and Coat. 2. Hence generally, armor, or any defensive covering. 3. (Naut.) A contrivance of interlinked rings, for rubbing off the loose hemp on lines and white cordage. 4. (Zoöl.) Any hard protective covering of an animal, as the scales and plates of reptiles, shell of a lobster, etc. We . . . strip the lobster of his scarlet mail. Gay.nn1. To arm with mail. 2. To pinion. [Obs.]nn1. A bag; a wallet. [Obs.] Chaucer. 2. The bag or bags with the letters, papers, papers, or other matter contained therein, conveyed under public authority from one post office to another; the whole system of appliances used by government in the conveyance and delivery of mail matter. There is a mail come in to-day, with letters dated Hague. Tatler. 3. That which comes in the mail; letters, etc., received through the post office. 4. A trunk, box, or bag, in which clothing, etc., may be carried. [Obs.] Sir W. Scott. Mail bag, a bag in which mailed matter is conveyed under public authority. — Mail boat, a boat that carries the mail. — Mail catcher, an iron rod, or other contrivance, attached to a railroad car for catching a mail bag while the train is in motion. — Mail guard, an officer whose duty it is to guard the public mails. [Eng.] — Mail train, a railroad train carrying the mail.nnTo deliver into the custody of the postoffice officials, or place in a government letter box, for transmission by mail; to post; as, to mail a letter. [U. S.] Note: In the United States to mail and to post are both in common use; as, to mail or post a letter. In England post is the commoner usage.
  • Mica : The name of a group of minerals characterized by highly perfect cleavage, so that they readily separate into very thin leaves, more or less elastic. They differ widely in composition, and vary in color from pale brown or yellow to green or black. The transparent forms are used in lanterns, the doors of stoves, etc., being popularly called isinglass. Formerly called also cat-silver, and glimmer. Note: The important species of the mica group are: muscovite, common or potash mica, pale brown or green, often silvery, including damourite (also called hydromica); biotite, iron-magnesia mica, dark brown, green, or black; lepidomelane, iron, mica, black; phlogopite, magnesia mica, colorless, yellow, brown; lepidolite, lithia mica, rose-red, lilac. Mica (usually muscovite, also biotite) is an essential constituent of granite, gneiss, and mica slate; biotite is common in many eruptive rocks; phlogopite in crystalline limestone and serpentine. Mica diorite (Min.), an eruptive rock allied to diorite but containing mica (biotite) instead of hornblende. — Mica powder, a kind of dynamite containing fine scales of mica. — Mica schist, Mica slate (Geol.), a schistose rock, consisting of mica and quartz with, usually, some feldspar.


Similar Posts

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *